Piloting a new tool to measure environmental impact

A new tool planned for later this year will help ministries gather data about their activities, to help plan and implement better responses into the future as part of the Province’s Laudato Si’ Action Plan.

The Australian Jesuit Province is continuing on its reconciliation with creation journey, with a new tool being developed that will help ministries measure their environmental impact.

Australian Jesuit ministries have been invited to nominate by 26 August to help pilot the tool, which is being developed in conjunction with environmental consultancy firm 100% Renewables.

The tool will help ministries gather data about their activities, to help plan and implement better responses into the future as part of the Province’s Laudato Si’ Action Plan. Three ministries will be chosen to pilot the tool, with the aim of rolling it out to all ministries by the end of the year.

Piloting the tool with a range of ministries will help it be adapted so it’s relevant to the diverse contexts within which the Province operates.

‘It’s the next step on our Laudato Si’ journey, undertaking that process to be Laudato Si’ communities’, says Sue Martin, the Province’s Reconciliation with Creation Project Officer.

Caring for creation has been nominated as a priority for the Society of Jesus in Australia and globally. Launching the Laudato Si’ Action Plan Framework in 2021, Fr Quyen Vu said it was an opportunity to ‘go deeper and seek out the Magis’ in terms of our response to the call for reconciliation with creation.

‘It is not about recording what we do already, but rather identifying what more we could do, in material and measurable terms – in the differenct context of each of our ministries and works – to achieve ecological conversion and better outcomes for our common homes’, he said.

Information about the pilot has been sent out to all Province heads of ministry. If anyone requires more information about the project, they can contact Sue Martin on sue.martin@sjasl.org.au.

Photo by mick orlick on Unsplash.

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